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Should I Buy a Wii U?

After an inauspicious 2013, E3 2014 saw Nintendo's embattled Wii U invigorated by a smorgasbord of exciting new releases, With that in mind, Team USG poses the question - should you buy one?

Article by USgamer Team, .

Despite what Xbox One and PlayStation 4 fans might lead you to believe, the new generation kicked off not last year, but in 2012, when Nintendo rolled out Wii U. While it might now be facing stiff, technologically superior competition from the two new kids on the block, Nintendo's focus has always been more on the quality of its games, and not necessarily cutting-edge hardware.

That was very much evident at this year's E3, when Nintendo unveiled a terrific array of titles. After a rather disappointing 2013, the likes of Yoshi's Woolly World, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker and Mario Maker really helped raise Wii U's profile, and brought the machine back into the gaming public's eye. But are these upcoming releases a compelling enough reason to pick up one of these quirky little consoles, or is the system destined to be a cult classic - appreciated by a select few? Team USG put their heads together and answered this one simple question: should I buy a Wii U?

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Bob Mackey Senior Writer

Should you buy a Wii U?

YES

My answer is "yes," but let me qualify that. Should you buy a Wii U? Yes, of course-provided it isn't your only console. Simply put, the Wii U isn't going to give you many of the same experiences you'll find on the PC, PS4, and the Xbox One. If, the Grand Theft Auto series, for example, has a future, it's definitely not going to be on a Nintendo console. But as a trade-off, you'll be able to play games unavailable anywhere else-and, as expected from Nintendo-developed productions, they're typically phenomenal.

The Wii U certainly has its weaknesses: Its tech can't compare to the competition's, and few games have made use of its unique GamePad, an input device with far more potential than what we've seen so far. At the same time, though, the console has seen a fantastic line-up of games, all in less than two years since its launch. If you lived through any of Nintendo's past three consoles, you should know the score by now: plenty of amazing first party titles, but not much else to speak of-though the eShop has seen some amazing indie games of late. As long as you're happy with that set of circumstances, you'll be happy with your Wii U.

The six best Wii U games to play right now:

  • Super Mario 3D World
  • Donkey Kong: Tropical Freeze
  • Monster Hunter 3U
  • Pikmin 3
  • Mario Kart 8
  • Pushmo World

Three most-anticipated Wii U games:

  • Xenoblade Chronicles X
  • Bayonetta 2
  • Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker
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Jeremy Parish Editor-in-Chief

Should you buy a Wii U?

YES

I was already on board with the Wii U - in the near term it offers a whole lot more quality material than the "next-gen" consoles, which are still taking baby steps toward library-building, and in the long term I figured it might end up with quite a few Nintendo first-party titles I want to play. After E3, though, I feel much more confident in Nintendo's determination to stick with the platform regardless of its fortunes at retail, at least through the end of 2015. Between the excellent games on the horizon, the full support for Wii software (some of which is super great, OK?), and the steadily growing Virtual Console lineup, Wii U has become a no-brainer.

The six best Wii U games to play right now:

  • Super Mario 3D World
  • NES Remix
  • EarthBound
  • The Legend of Zelda Wind Waker HD
  • Pikmin 3
  • Pushmo World

Three most-anticipated Wii U games:

  • Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker
  • Mario Maker
  • Xenoblade Chronicles X
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Jaz Rignall Editor-at-Large

Should you buy a Wii U?

NO

I hate to say no, because it's so, so, soooo close to being a yes. But for me, the cost of the Wii U remains a little too high, and despite a steady trickle of releases, there still aren't quite enough top-quality Wii U games to justify its price tag. At least, not right now. But I think that will change soon enough.

Nintendo had a great E3, and showed a superb range of games that turned me from feeling mostly apathetic about the machine to genuinely wanting one so I could play the likes of Bayonetta 2, Yoshi's Woolly World and Super Smash Bros. However, since quite a few of the games I'm most keen to play won't be out for a while, I'm going to hold out on buying a system in the hope that its price will drop to a more wallet-friendly $229 - maybe this Xmas. If it does, and once we see all of those E3 games hitting store shelves, I'll be more than happy to open my wallet and finally join the Wii U faithful.

The six best Wii U games to play right now:

  • Pushmo World
  • Mario Kart 8
  • Super Mario 3D World
  • Wonderful 101
  • Sonic Lost World
  • Mutant Mudds Deluxe

Three most-anticipated Wii U games:

  • Splatoon
  • Bayonetta 2
  • Mario Maker
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Brendan Sinclair Contributing Editor

Should you buy a Wii U?

YES

I haven't really touched the Wii U since finishing up Pikmin 3, but I would still buy one now if I didn't already have one in the house because nothing bugs me more than not being able to play a game I'm already sold on. And after getting a chance to play a bit of it at E3, I'm completely sold on Yoshi's Wooly World.

But if I were a more rational person, I have to say a Wii U purchase would make little to no sense for me. I'm pretty burnt out on most Nintendo franchises, the third-party lineup is thinner than the plot of Super Smash Bros., and even though there are some great indies on the system, most of them are also launching on other systems I own that don't have the same space constraints for digital titles. I will say Nintendo's upcoming lineup for the Wii U is as impressive as any they've fielded for the system yet, and I expect Mario Kart 8 and Super Smash Bros. to pull it from "debacle" status all the way up to "disappointment." But that's a long way from "worth spending $300 on" for all but the most diehard Nintendo fans.

The six best Wii U games to play right now:

  • Pikmin 3
  • Super Mario 3D World
  • Rayman Legends
  • Tekken Tag Tournament 2
  • Trine 2: Director's Cut
  • The Cave

Three most-anticipated Wii U games:

  • Yoshi's Woolly World
  • Bayonetta 2
  • Mario Maker
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Kat Bailey Senior Editor

Should you buy a Wii U?

YES

After a rough start, the Wii U is starting to round into its own. Mario Kart 8 was a real jolt for the platform; and with console exclusives like Shovel Knight and Super Mario 3D World, as well as a handful of third-party efforts like Wonderful 101, it boasts a library roughly as strong as the PlayStation 4 and the Xbox One. But of course, the really good stuff is still to come.

Following an extremely strong appearance at E3, Wii U owners can look forward to a number of exciting games, including Super Smash Bros., The Legend of Zelda, and Xenoblade Chronicles X. And that's leaving out Splatoon, which surprised and delighted observers with its unique third-person shooter mechanics. The Wii U may not reach its potential in 2015, but the future certainly looks far brighter than it did this time last year.

Obviously, no one is going to argue that the Wii U is a replacement for either of the next-gen systems. But that's not to say its bad. Though it's had the unfortunate effect of driving up the Wii U's price, the Gamepad has proven to be a versatile and worthwhile second screen device. And unlike its more expensive competition, the Wii U offers backward compatibility with all Wii and eShop games. It's just that it hasn't had the opportunity to really shine in terms of content until now.

With Nintendo continuing to kill it with its first-party games, and more strong titles on the way, I finally feel comfortable recommending the Wii U to curious bystanders. Ultimately, it will always be more of a boutique console than its competition; a companion platform that offers up experiences you won't find anywhere else. But its that unique approach to game development that increasingly sets the Wii U apart. Nintendo fans have probably already picked up a console. Now its time for more casual fans to follow suit.

The six best Wii U games to play right now:

  • Mario Kart 8
  • Shovel Knight
  • Super Mario 3D World
  • Donkey Kong Country Tropical Freeze
  • NES Remix 2
  • The Legend Zelda: Wing Waker HD

Three most-anticipated Wii U games:

  • The Legend of Zelda
  • Super Smash Bros.
  • Xenoblade Chronicles X
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Mike Williams Staff Writer

Should you buy a Wii U?

NO

Like Bob's "YES," my lack of recommendation comes with many caveats. Unlike some, I'm pushed further towards games that go multiplatform; my favorites tend towards Assassin's Creed and other open-world titles, most of which skip Nintendo's platform entirely. While I love Nintendo - I bought the system on my birthday for a reason - I bought the Wii U more for its potential than what it may have on the store shelves now.

Kat is quick to qualify the system saying it's library is roughly as strong as the PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One, but the last two are systems that haven't even been out a year and the first will run on into infinity with variety. Bob notes it's not a replacement for those platforms (or the PS3 and Xbox 360), leaving Nintendo in the situation where you buy a lead platform and a Wii U. That's not the best place to be and though Nintendo is bringing some solid stuff to bear, I don't think it'll do much but keep them afloat until the next home and handheld console.

Without my early adopter gene at work, I tend to stick to the rule of two. Two games I really love before I buy a system. Mario Kart 8 is one, and Zelda Wii U or Splatoon will probably be the other, but they aren't out yet. So, I'm in a limbo when it comes to recommending the system to others.

The six best Wii U games to play right now:

  • Mario Kart 8
  • Shovel Knight
  • Super Mario 3D World
  • Wonderful 101
  • Scribblenauts Unlimited
  • Zombi U

Three most-anticipated Wii U games:

  • The Legend of Zelda
  • Splatoon
  • Yoshi's Woolly World

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Comments 59

  • Avatar for Guy-Guy #1 Guy-Guy 3 years ago
    This article pretty much is exactly how I feel with Nintendo anything anymore.
    "It has good games--- but it better not be your primary console."

    Nintendo makes good games, and like the Wii I'm sure the Wii U will eventually come to boast an eclectic roster of 3rd-party exclusives as well. But, also alike the Wii I suspect both the 3rd party greats to absolutely bomb in value and the system to fall to a pittance of a price not much longer from now.
    It's one of those things. Occassionally I like a Nintendo title, and Super Luigi U looks like an amazing game in my eyes, but the fact that Nintendo consoles tend to cater solely to Nintendo titles with the occasional adventuring 3rd-party hoping to make a buck--- just blegh. I grew up with the NES, and no matter how much Nintendo games evolve I always end up getting that same-same taste from them, and can only enjoy about one Nintendo title a year before ultimately becoming bored.
    Nintendo games are tempting, and those weird 3rd-party exclusives that grace their systems are enticing--- but it's just not worth it for someone who hopes to get a lot of use out of their crazily expensive electronics that they really shouldn't be blowing money on anyway.
    Oh well.Edited November 2013 by Guy-Guy
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  • Avatar for Roto13 #2 Roto13 3 years ago
    @lonecow Yeah, "It has shovelware" is not a valid point. Whether shovelware exists on a platform doesn't matter to an informed gamer. It has no effect on me or other Wii U owners who know what games to buy. Some crappy cartoon dog pet sim isn't going to trick me out of buying The Wonderful 101.
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  • Avatar for Guy-Guy #3 Guy-Guy 3 years ago
    @lonecow I think the point of that comment is that the Wii U library is misleadingly numbered. It isn't about comparing a quality title to shovelware, but that, quite literally as the quote says, for every quality title the next is shovelware. A consumer's genuine selection on Nintendo hardware is not in relation to the actual amount of games available, but to a select few.
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  • Avatar for jeremycarrier12 #4 jeremycarrier12 3 years ago
    I'm in the Parish camp with this one. Wii U has some of the finest games of the year in Pikmin 3, Wonderful 101, and Super Mario 3D World looks to be adding to that. Next year, there's Tropical Freeze, Bayonetta 2, new Smash, X, whatever else they haven't announced. Some of the best games of the year are exclusive to the Wii U, and that's worth it for me.

    HOWEVER

    I have no intention of making that my sole console. I can't miss out all those many, many third party games that Nintendo will just never get. Its not a primary console, and quite frankly, Nintendo consoles haven't been primary console material for me since the SNES. But as something on the side, a secondary console you break out once a month for a great exclusive or a bout of Smash Bros with your friends, it's worth it.
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  • Avatar for LunarKnite #5 LunarKnite 3 years ago
    While it's not my primary console overall, it is my primary home box. Maybe I'm just not that impressed with so-called AAA titles, but the big third party games haven't interested me in a while. I'm more interested in the smaller stuff, like Ubisoft's Child of Light, than their newest AC. The PS4/Xbone have less than 10 games announced/released combined that I'd actually want to purchase. The Wii U personally already has that number in exclusives by itself.

    With a 3DS and a competent, if a few years old, PC, I pretty much have access to most games available that I want. But maybe I'm just a fan of Nintendo games.
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  • Avatar for docexe #6 docexe 3 years ago
    If you are part of the so named hardcore gaming audience and want to play as many games as possible from certain genres and most of the 3rd parties, Nintendo's consoles stopped being the “primary gaming” platform since the N64 era. But if you like Nintendo games, outside of money impediments, I don’t see any reason why you shouldn’t buy one, as they still produce fantastic games, even if not exactly as groundbreaking as in their golden years.

    Many people might bemoan those facts, I have come to accept them as natural, and I’m dead set on getting a Wii U and a PS4 at some point either next year or the year after at the most.

    And while the Wii U success might ultimately be limited in the end, it’s slowly building a decent library of games that are distinct enough from the other next gen consoles, and attractive enough to merit a look.
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  • Avatar for Captain-Gonru #7 Captain-Gonru 3 years ago
    Should you buy a Wii U? (sorry, had to do it) Yes. I got mine at launch, and it immediately became my primary console. Yes, there are some dud games, but that's true of any system. Wii U has a greater breadth of games than the current offerings of the other two, and frankly, did a year ago, too. And Nintendo always has a wider age and experience range available in their games. Want hardcore, grown up action? ZombiU. Nieces and nephews in town to visit? Nintendo Land. A night in with friends and drinks? Tekken Tag Tourney (with Nintendo-themed costumes for laughs). Oh, and with it being the only backwards compatible system, you've got a much larger potential library of games from day one.
    Should it be your only console? Probably not. You'll need something to play GTA V on.
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  • Avatar for ShadowTheSecond #8 ShadowTheSecond 3 years ago
    My WiiU gets more use than my 360/PS3 by far (Ghosts on 360, and Beyond on PS3 being their only respective on times lately). The Virtual Console has been okay, downloadable only games have been satisfactory, and the Nintendo games have been great. Things like Arkham Origins have been worth getting on WiiU as well in my opinion--a map or perhaps some playing on the Gamepad while my wife is using the TV? Why thank you! Granted, third party games are on most of the other systems and I suspect we'll stop seeing many on the WiiU after next year (I'm guessing 360 and PS3 will get support through Christmas 2014 or beyond, and thus at least partially have their games show up on WiiU).

    Still, my iPad and 3DS get more attention than my limited time with the consoles. I think it's safe to say that mobile devices and Nintendo's own portable are causing more issues for WiiU than the PS4 or X1.Edited November 2013 by ShadowTheSecond
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  • Avatar for CK20XX #9 CK20XX 3 years ago
    @lonecow@Roto13@FreeTheMechs It might also have to do with shovelware being a substance that buries worthwhile games, leading to third party developers abandoning the platform in frustration when they can't stand out. Most consumers are not anywhere near as well informed as us either, and if they feel averse to what looks like a sea of junk, that's going to drag the whole console down. And, lest we forget, software bloat like that was one of the contributing factors to the great crash of 1982.
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  • Avatar for BigBauss #10 BigBauss 3 years ago
    I stick with my standard question: does it have at least six games I really want to play?

    This question is why I avoided a PS3 until MGS4 came out (saving myself 200 dollars in the process) and why I don't plan on buying either PS4 or XBOne anytime soon.

    And, while some compare it to Gamecube, I suspect the N64 is a more apt descriptor. Yes, it will still get the big 3rd party titles, but they'll be hamstrung by technology issues (cartridges then, five-year-old tech now) and peculiar controllers (trident then, tablet now). So, much like every Nintendo console since the SNES, just focus on first and second party software, and you'll have a roaring time.
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  • Avatar for BigBauss #11 BigBauss 3 years ago
    Also of note: people have paid over 150 dollars just to play Earthbound, so having it on Virtual Console is actually a huge get.
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  • Avatar for RonF #12 RonF 3 years ago
    I just brought my Wii U and I am very happy with my purchase, even anxious to play Super Mario 3D World next week. Quite frankly, I am not impressed with most PS4 or XBone titles, much in the same way I wasn't impressed with the Wii U launch lineup.
    I am pretty sure that, eventually, Sony and Microsoft will have a library worthy of having their consoles. However, they made them so close to a PC, they I might go with the a real one this time to complement my Nintendo console.
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  • Avatar for DiscordInc #13 DiscordInc 3 years ago
    I think I might be one of the few people who has a Wii U and am completely fine with making it my sole console. I don't have a much time to play video games, so the small selection doesn't really hurt me, especially considering I am a Nintendo fan. Combine that with my apathy for Microsoft and Sony's consoles, and I've been very happy with my choice.

    Now if I was playing a lot more games I might feel the need to supplement it with another console, but right now the Steam Box seems to have more promise than the other two.
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  • Avatar for bullet656 #14 bullet656 3 years ago
    I have to second what Jeremey wrote. I don’t regret my purchase of a Wii U at all. However, I’d only recommend buying one for those that have another, primary, console. As much as I’ve enjoyed the games I’ve played on it, my Wii U spends long periods of time collecting dust and doing little else.
    I liked Nintendo Land, but can’t say I spent too much time with it before growing bored. I loved New Super Mario Bros U and Pikman 3, and was excited to finally able to play Earthbound on a console. I’m planning on buying Super Mario Bros 3D World at lunch today, and am sure I’ll have a lot of fun with that too. But that’s it for at least awhile for games I feel I have to have. I’ll probably buy Wind Waker HD at some point, and I kind of want to check out the Wonderful 101, but it’s not a game that I really want to pay full price for.Edited November 2013 by bullet656
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  • Avatar for Guy-Guy #15 Guy-Guy 3 years ago
    @BigBauss Sure, but it's also a gigantic middle finger to Wii owners.
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  • Avatar for Thusian #16 Thusian 3 years ago
    For me it is going to be my soul console at least for the foreseeable future. I just don't like a lot of the AAA space, and the few that are interesting so far, have been ported to Wii U. I already own over 15 retail games for the system and one of those I logged over 250 hours on (Monster Hunter Ultimate). I mostly like Party games and the odd single player experiences, but not really shooters. As a result I just don't have that much pulling me onto the other systems. I guess if you count my 3DS its not my only console, but between my 2 bits of Nintendo hardware, I just don't have a need for either of the other two.

    And I want to be clear, that is not a slight on anyone enjoying the other two systems. I just see them courting a taste that does not align with me. So I'm grateful I have a WiiU and got to play Rayman asynchronous and Wonderful 101,
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  • Avatar for KrissB #17 KrissB 3 years ago
    Hang on just a sec. Why is everyone saying that the Wii U is lacking quality software? Look what's out right now - New Super Mario Bros. U, New Super Luigi U, Super Mario 3D World, Nintendo Land, LEGO City Undercover, Game & Wario, Pikmin 3, Scribblenauts Unlimited & Unmasked, Assassin's Creed 3 & 4, Batman: Arkham City & Origins, COD: Black Ops II & Ghosts, Monster Hunter Tri Ultimate, NFS: Undercover, Wonderful 101, Sonic: Lost World, Injustice, Wii Fit U, Wii Party U, Wii Sports Club, Splinter Cell: Blacklist, Zombi U, Sonic & All-Stars Racing, Rayman Legends, Zelda: Wind Waker HD, Resident Evil: Revelations, Deus-Ex: Human Revolution,Cloudberry Kingdom, Toki Tori 2, Trine 2...

    Now, look what's coming - Mario Kart 8, DK: Tropical Freeze, Watch_Dogs, Bayonetta 2, Shin Megami Tensei X Fire Emblem, X, Dragon Quest X, Yarn Yoshi - not to mention all the awesome indie games, such as A.N.N.E, Unlikely Legend of Rusty Pup, Shovel Knight, Tengami, Teslagrad, Mighty No. 9, Child of Light, Festival of Magic, Oliver & Spike, Ballpoint Universe, C-Wars, Rex Rocket, Soul Saga, Forgotten Memories, Q.U.B.E, Pier Solar, Scram Kitty, Citizens of Earth, Two Brothers, Dusty Raging Fist, Armikrog and That 90's Arcade Racer.

    TBH, I'd be perfectly happy being a Nintendo-only gamer. These days, I don't have much time for games - and Sony & Microsoft are becoming less and less appealing each day. With Wii, 3DS and PC, I have everything I need.

    In regards to 3rd party support... I dunno, I feel the situation is different this time - but not in the way you may think. Lately, I've been getting very tired of the attitudes and self-destructive behaviours of 3rd parties (not to mention their tiresome, generic games). For so long, they've mocked Nintendo (hello EA & Epic) for using 'underpowered' hardware thst proritised low-cost and high-profits. Continuously, they've flocked to the power-obsessed Sony & MS - and have suffered mightily as a result. Last gen, 130 developers/publishers have gone bust - yet, they just won't learn. They're now making the exact same mistakes - spending millions upon millions on development; only to see diminishing returns. I have a feeling that the most important 3rd parties to Nintendo this gen will be the indies.
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  • Avatar for KrissB #18 KrissB 3 years ago
    Hang on just a sec. Why is everyone saying that the Wii U is lacking quality software? Look what's out right now - New Super Mario Bros. U, New Super Luigi U, Super Mario 3D World, Nintendo Land, LEGO City Undercover, Game & Wario, Pikmin 3, Scribblenauts Unlimited & Unmasked, Assassin's Creed 3 & 4, Batman: Arkham City & Origins, COD: Black Ops II & Ghosts, Monster Hunter Tri Ultimate, NFS: Undercover, Wonderful 101, Sonic: Lost World, Injustice, Wii Fit U, Wii Party U, Wii Sports Club, Splinter Cell: Blacklist, Zombi U, Sonic & All-Stars Racing, Rayman Legends, Zelda: Wind Waker HD, Resident Evil: Revelations, Deus-Ex: Human Revolution,Cloudberry Kingdom, Toki Tori 2, Trine 2...

    Now, look what's coming - Mario Kart 8, DK: Tropical Freeze, Watch_Dogs, Bayonetta 2, Shin Megami Tensei X Fire Emblem, X, Dragon Quest X, Yarn Yoshi - not to mention all the awesome indie games, such as A.N.N.E, Unlikely Legend of Rusty Pup, Shovel Knight, Tengami, Teslagrad, Mighty No. 9, Child of Light, Festival of Magic, Oliver & Spike, Ballpoint Universe, C-Wars, Rex Rocket, Soul Saga, Forgotten Memories, Q.U.B.E, Pier Solar, Scram Kitty, Citizens of Earth, Two Brothers, Dusty Raging Fist, Armikrog and That 90's Arcade Racer.

    TBH, I'd be perfectly happy being a Nintendo-only gamer. These days, I don't have much time for games - and Sony & Microsoft are becoming less and less appealing each day. With Wii, 3DS and PC, I have everything I need.

    In regards to 3rd party support... I dunno, I feel the situation is different this time - but not in the way you may think. Lately, I've been getting very tired of the attitudes and self-destructive behaviours of 3rd parties (not to mention their tiresome, generic games). For so long, they've mocked Nintendo (hello EA & Epic) for using 'underpowered' hardware thst proritised low-cost and high-profits. Continuously, they've flocked to the power-obsessed Sony & MS - and have suffered mightily as a result. Last gen, 130 developers/publishers have gone bust - yet, they just won't learn. They're now making the exact same mistakes - spending millions upon millions on development; only to see diminishing returns. I have a feeling that the most important 3rd parties to Nintendo this gen will be the indies.
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  • Avatar for jimdove76 #19 jimdove76 3 years ago
    Im hoping to pick one up sometime soon in the near future. I like to collect gaming consoles. Liking the reports on the Zelda game too, been far too long since I played ocarina of time. For some reason I didnt play any Zelda game since.
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  • Avatar for MissDeviling #20 MissDeviling 3 years ago
    Yeah, I'll probably hold out on a Wii U till end of next year when Bayo 2 and X come out. May nab WW HD as well. Hope Nintendo announces a console Fire Emblem or Pokemon spin-off!
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  • Avatar for Sturat #21 Sturat 3 years ago
    If you want to play this year's best games, you'll need a Wii U to do it. My wife and I have had a ton of fun playing 2-player Pikmin 3.

    If you have the money to buy multiple consoles per generation but you still want to be economical, you would probably save the most money by getting the Wii U this year and buying a different system later. Nintendo games aren't going to drop in price nearly as quickly as games from other publishers.
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  • Avatar for zerøkaos55 #22 zerøkaos55 3 years ago
    A price drop after New Years..? Are you kidding? It literally JUST dropped in price and they're losing money on each system. They're not going to drop the price again any time soon.
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  • Avatar for d0x #23 d0x 2 years ago
    All you need to ask is "are you a gamer". If the answer is yes then you should buy a new console (or 2) and then buy a wiiu.

    You don't want it as your primary machine and it is EXTREMELY expensive considering you will probably only buy 1-3 AAA games a year on it. 4-6 if you include games from 3rd parties.

    You will also buy some virtual console games. You might use the YouTube app.

    Its a good standby console to own. You can (usually) count on Nintendo games although I've been quite let down since I'm not a fan of games like pikman or some of the other non classic franchise games. The good news is there is Mario kart and a couple of Mario titles that are fantastic. By 2016 we will have a new open world Zelda and hopefully metroid.

    The main issue is money flow. If you don't have a large gaming budget you are better off waiting till its below $200 otherwise pick it up now.
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  • Avatar for touchofkiel #24 touchofkiel 2 years ago
    As usual, it comes down to this: do you like first-party Nintendo games? As usual, third party support is poor, and the big-name multi-platform games simply do not come to Nintendo's systems (and if they do, often they're inferior ports). Such is the way it goes, and that's not all that terrible. But if you're not into the first-party stuff, you're gonna have one hell of a slim library.

    Me, I do like the first-party stuff - particularly Mario - but it's still just a little too early to spring for the console yet.

    It really just comes down to preference - what kind of games do you like? Though I do like platformers, my favorite genre by far is RPGs - Nintendo's home consoles haven't had great RPG libraries since the SNES! (Which isn't to say that each console didn't have some gems here and there).

    The PS3 ended up with a great selection of big names like Final Fantasy, Tales, etc., obscure NIS titles, and the big-name open-ended Western RPGs. Though maybe not to the same degree, I suspect we'll see the same type of assortment on PS4. The Wii U, on the other hand... will have a new Xenoblade. I can name one more upcoming RPG for Wii U (Persona/Fire Emblem), and it's a crossover that doesn't appeal to me too much, strangely. If I'm weighing the Wii U on my favorite genre, RPGs, then it's pretty clear I should NOT buy one.

    But the non-RPG combo of Mario World and Mario Kart is too tempting to pass up.
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  • Avatar for WelkinGunther #25 WelkinGunther 2 years ago
    Im sick of people telling me what my 'primary' and 'secondary' consoles should be.
    PS4 hasn't shown me anything other than americanized, weaponized crap, and yet it automatically deserves 'primary console' status. . . why? Because of third-party games? Well, I just don't think most third-party games are good. They used to be, in the ps1-ps2 era, but now they're kind of just like Happy Meals.
    My primary console is a Wii U, I MIGHT get a ps4 as a secondary console, if they ever show anything good.
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  • Avatar for Funny_Colour_Blue #26 Funny_Colour_Blue 2 years ago
    @WelkinGunther I feel the same way. Sony was great when 3rd party developers like Squaresoft, Capcom, Namco and Konami were migrating to Sony's platform, making these incredibly creative and fun games for their systems on the cheap.

    But in 2014, things are different, most of those developers are either gone now or struggling to remain relevant, because the costs have become so high.

    I do not want to pay 400 dollars for a system that MIGHT have good games.
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  • Avatar for Darkarm66 #27 Darkarm66 2 years ago
    I have a Wii U. I love it. And I don't mind it being my lead console....whatever that means. The software is outstanding and unlike the other main consoles, their big release this holiday season won't be an HD collection or rerelease of last gen games. And even if the current lineup doesn't grab you because you're needlessly picky, it still has amazing backwards compatibility and doesn't try to screw for your 10 more dollars for games you already own (I'm looking at you, PlayStation Now!).

    Even it's price point, with MK8, is still cheaper...and it still gets you a free game!
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  • Avatar for pashaveliki #28 pashaveliki 2 years ago
    As weird as it sounds, the Wii U has definitely defaulted to primary console. Most of the games I want to play are being produced by Nintendo 1st and 2nd party. Nintendo this gen has been, in my opinion, on a creative streak unmatched really since the Dreamcast and the Wii U tickles the part of my brain that keeps a Dreamcast under the TV.
    That being said, I understand a "No" if you want shooters, open-world games or the color brown. I like it when games make me smile, and the Wii U catalogue to date excels at that and the prospects only seem sunnier.
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  • Avatar for pashaveliki #29 pashaveliki 2 years ago
    @MissDeviling Fire Emblem X Shin Megami Tensai is in the works for Wii U
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  • Avatar for Ohoni #30 Ohoni 2 years ago
    I have to say, I'm still in the "no" column, but this E3 moved me firmly out of the "helllllll no" column. Mario Kart 8? Awesome. New Zelda? Probably cool, need to see more. Splatoon? Incredibly clever, but could be a flash in the pan. It's still way too expensive for what it is, and the tablet is still a complete gimmick that could be removed from all games without hurting them in any significant way. I want to play the exclusive titles, just not enough to buy one at the current price.
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  • Avatar for laxking97 #31 laxking97 2 years ago
    My Wii U is my primary system for sure (at least for now). My Xbox One is gathering dust. I was extremely excited for Titanfall, heck I played tons and tons of it during the Beta but when it finally came out I probably played it for a week or two and then got bunt out on it. When the Halo collection comes out that might change for a while, but for now my Wii U gets all my attention. Between MK8, SM3DW, Pikmin 3, Nintendo Land and Wind Waker, I'm set for a while. Add on Smash Bros, Bayonetta, Hyrule Warriors, Zelda, Captain Toad, Mario Maker, Splatoon, Yoshi, X, FE x SMT, Star Fox, and the two other Miyamoto projects, plus whatever else Nintendo Nintendo is working on, and I'm good.

    Also, for those worried about the pricing, I've read online that the refurbed consoles that you can buy from Nintendo seem to be in really good condition for $200 (and it still comes with Nintendo Land). My friend got one and said that it's seems brand new. He got a killer deal because right after he ordered it he found a buy two get one free deal so he got MK8, SM3DW and another game. Then using the MK deal he got a download for Wind Waker. So including Nintendo Land, he got the system and 5 games for ~$320 plus tax.

    I'd say that that is a good price for the system, even if he couldn't get the b2g1, the MK8 deal alone is great if you just barely bought the Wii U.
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  • Avatar for WelkinGunther #32 WelkinGunther 2 years ago
    @Funny_Colour_Blue I just realized how old this article is:
    OOOOKAAAAAAYYYY
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  • Avatar for WelkinGunther #33 WelkinGunther 2 years ago
    Deleted June 2014 by WelkinGunther
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  • Avatar for Pacario #34 Pacario 2 years ago
    I got one just last week--it's the basic model, but the discounted price made it irresistible. This is because, while I think the system is worth owning, it's still overpriced, and I intend to really only buy a handful of titles for it.

    Indeed, my first impressions are somewhat mixed. The controller is comfortable but huge, forcing me to usually lay it on my lap, and I find myself often torn between looking at the screen or at the TV. The community features are actually pretty cool, but I miss the News and Forecast channels of the original Wii, and the Virtual Console as it currently stands is meager at best. Web surfing, however, is quite nice with that touch screen.

    In other words, yes, by all means get one, but no one is going to blame you for waiting until another price drop, or for buying a PS4 first. The Wii U is more quirky than cutting edge, more interesting than visionary, but as a complement to another console...why not?
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  • Avatar for Mega_Matt #35 Mega_Matt 2 years ago
    Nintendo first party games make it totally worth it for me. I bought the system on the day it came out for that reason alone. The lack of 3rd party support kind of sucks compared to other systems but, as lame as it is to say, that's expected from a Nintendo console these days. I'm ok with that though, because Nintendo offers me gaming experiences I can't get anywhere else.

    So that's why I bought one.
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  • Avatar for jeffcorry #36 jeffcorry 2 years ago
    I love my Wii U. If you want to enjoy Nintendo goodness it is the way to go, but I wouldn't feel like my gaming experience was complete if I didn't have my PS3 that can offer titles that are characteristically more in depth. So for every Mario, Pikmin, Zelda, and Virtual Console title; I really need to have a Tales, Arkham, Shadow of the Colossus, Valkyria, Street Fighter, or Final Fantasy.
    I don't feel like Nintendo can quite offer the complete package on its own. I don't own PS4 yet, but when the right game comes a long I will. I am not a one system guy. It seems that to really get the full spectrum of games these days, you need to be willing to have a couple systems: Nintendo (essential for exclusives) and one of the others (PS4, Xbox, or PC) for the third party or other games.
    I usually choose Sony and Nintendo. Which is where I start thinking that MAYBE Nintendo shouldn't have abused Sony back in the 90s...Oh well competition breeds creativity, eh?
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  • Avatar for Pacario #37 Pacario 2 years ago
    @pashaveliki Nintendo's upcoming lineup is promising, but what's this "creative streak" you claim Nintendo is on? Indeed, most of the games Nintendo has released so far have not used the touch screen significantly, and most of them have been remakes, sequels, and platformers. That's not to say that titles like Mario 3-D World aren't creative (others like Wonderful 101 are third-party, so they don't really count), but the days of groundbreaking, revolutionary masterpieces akin to Ocarina and Mario 64 are apparently long gone.

    Even the upcoming, and admittedly creative, Captain Toad still seems more like a lightweight title compared to the "serious" titles of the competition, from Destiny to Evolve to No Man's Sky.
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  • Avatar for sam-stephens #38 sam-stephens 2 years ago
    @Pacario

    Nintendo is incredibly creative. They may use the same names and faces, but they always build upon and mix up the formula. I think gamers tend to see innovation and creativity superficially. New IP's and different game types are great, but that doesn't necessarily require creativity. The innovation and refinement on display in games like A Link Between Worlds, Super Mario 3D World, Nintendo Land, Pikmin 3, and even New Super Mario Bros. is quite staggering if you are very familiar with these titles. They are every bit as great as their predecessors; sometimes better even.Edited 2 times. Last edited June 2014 by sam-stephens
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  • Avatar for pashaveliki #39 pashaveliki 2 years ago
    @Pacario
    @sam-stephens said it better than I could. Nintendo used the same characters, but the underlining mechanics are constantly in flux. I look at AAA gaming, particularly third party multiplat games and see... alot of white guys gruffly shooting people in brown and grey hallways/cities/rubble. While I understand why some people like that, I like games with whimsy. And the sheer joy that are built into some of Nintendo's line-up as of late bring the whimsy in a big way.
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  • Avatar for Pacario #40 Pacario 2 years ago
    @sam-stephens and pashaveliki

    It depends, I suppose, on one's definition of innovation. If mere variation on an existing theme/concept scratches that "innovation" itch for you, then I guess there's nothing else to say. Was adding a slide mechanic to Mega Man 3 innovative? Or adding the charge shot to his mega buster in 4? I guess you could argue that, but...

    To me, true innovation forces one to see the medium, or at least the given genre, in a different light. Mario 64 did this for the platformer, Ocarina for the adventure genre, and I guess even Smash Bros. for fighting games. But lately, it's been the other companies who are regularly redefining our perception of what games are. Portal, Journey, The Last of Us, Bioshock, Mass Effect, Minecraft...these titles go beyond mere creativity and become phenomenons in their respective spaces.

    Is Nintendo creative? Sure, to a degree. But the company is actually pretty conservative with the games it creates, rarely taking huge gameplay or IP risks in favor of reproducing older concepts that boast a decidedly nostalgic history. These titles, from Mario 3-D World to the upcoming Yoshi Woolly World, are fun and polished to an exacting degree, but they owe their designs to the past upon which they are built.

    Innovation, however, is based primarily on the future, of what might, could, should be. Mario and Kirby and Yoshi are great, but they aren't changing the future. They're merely updates to what's come before.
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  • Avatar for docexe #41 docexe 2 years ago
    It’s slowly gaining a library that’s quite distinctive compared to the competition. I’m glad it’s getting more positive attention after E3 2014. It’s pretty much impossible it will become a wide success, but at least it has better chance now of turning into a cult classic of a console rather than an abject failure.

    The way, I see it if you like Nintendo’s first and second party games, or want something that is different from what it’s being offered by the rest of the AAA sector, there is no reason outside of monetary impediments for not buying one this Fall.

    Of course, if you also like games from 3rd party publishers, or genres like RPG, shooters and open world games, then you should buy as well another console, but that has been the state of affairs with Nintendo home consoles since the N64.
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  • Avatar for sam-stephens #42 sam-stephens 2 years ago
    @Pacario

    Was adding a slide mechanic to Mega Man 3 innovative? Or adding the charge shot to his mega buster in 4?"

    These are innovations in a sense. However, Nintendo has done much more than just add new mechanics to their games. There are large structual changes involved. A Link Between Worlds is obvious with Ravio's item shop and the combination of A Link to the Past's 2D combat with 3D space and puzzles. Pikmin 3 emphasizes micromanagement with three captains, retaining both the complex environments from the second game and the time enforced tension of the first while offering up new ways to simplify space. Super Mario 3D Land completely breaks down 3D space by offering 8-way directional controls and 3D World expanded upon that concept. This kind of deep exploration of game design is very rare and Nintendo are one of the few developers who are doing it.

    "Portal, Journey, The Last of Us, Bioshock, Mass Effect, Minecraft"

    With the exception of Portal, there isn't much game design innovation here. Journey and Minecraft aren't really games, so they innovate in very different ways. BioShock, Mass Effect, and The Last of Us have ambitious storytelling, but in terms of gameplay, they don't do anything radical (all three are shooters with lite RPG elements and none of them do this concept well in my opinion).

    " but they owe their designs to the past upon which they are built."

    So does every game. There would be no innovation if there wasn't some thing to innovate from. Pretty much every video game released now owes a lot to the past; if not to genre, then to design philosophies.

    "Innovation, however, is based primarily on the future, of what might, could, should be."

    Again, I think this is a rather superficial understanding of innovation. Gamers are always excited about what's new and shiny, even if it doesn't involve gameplay. With a better understanding of design, I think gamers would better see how much change is happening under the hood. In that sense, if Nintendo Land isn't a sign of the future, I don't know what is. Even if the market doesn't take that concept anywhere, it's still a forward thinking game.Edited 3 times. Last edited June 2014 by sam-stephens
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  • Avatar for docexe #43 docexe 2 years ago
    @Pacario
    @sam-stephens


    Mmmm… I think it’s important to take into account the distinction between incremental innovation, what could be called “evolution”, and disruptive innovation, what could be called “revolution” (yeah, there are actually different schools of thought and categorization when it comes to the term “innovation”). It should be pointed out that both types are perfectly valid forms of advancing a medium or genre, but the impact of the later is more evident and significant in the short term, while the impact of the former can only be assessed after a long period of time and it’s usually the norm until another disruption happens.

    Honestly, Nintendo has been more concerned with incremental innovation these days, and they are not exactly the disruptive trend setters they were in their golden years of the NES-SNES-N64 eras, at least not when it comes to the actual gameplay and mechanics of their more representative franchises like Mario, Zelda or Pokémon (but in terms of games that are not aimed at core gamers, I honestly don’t think you can downplay the impact games like Brain Age, Nintendogs, Wii Sports or Wii Fit had in diversifying the potential audience for games).

    Of course, if we have to be honest and fair, when it comes to the rest of the home console industry and outside of very specific cases (the first Assassin’s Creed, COD 4: Modern Warfare, Gears of Wars, Portal, Little Big Planet, etc.), most games these days are also evolutionary rather than truly revolutionary in nature, at least when it comes to groundbreaking gameplay.

    Bioshock, Mass Effect, The Last of Us (and the Uncharted series for that matter), Grand Theft Auto IV, all those and similar games are revolutionary only in terms of story and presentation, not in terms of gameplay. That actually makes them similar to games like Final Fantasy VII and Metal Gear Solid that also advanced the form in terms of how to tell a story in a videogame as well as their cinematic presentation. But in terms of gameplay, they play as refined versions of things that have come before (which is pretty much the same case as most Nintendo games nowadays, if we have to be honest).

    Meanwhile, games like Destiny and Evolve are showing an evolution in terms of scope and online multiplayer, but right now they don’t exactly look to me as truly revolutionary in terms of gameplay. Especially in the case of Destiny, I have my doubts it will actually reach its full potential until the sequel which will very likely appear only on next gen platforms rather than still be tied (and limited to a degree) by the older PS3 and X360 generation.

    In terms of disruptive innovations and revolutionary gameplay, most of it nowadays is not happening on consoles or with the big publishers, but rather on PC, mobile and the indie space. Games like Minecraft, DayZ, Republique, possibly No Man's Sky, etc. (By the way, I’m always uncomfortable with the idea of stating that things like Minecraft or Journey are not games, they might be less structured or have limited interaction outside of a few basic actions, but they still follow rules, have some element of challenge and ultimately are still interactive).

    Note that I’m not trying to knock down any of these games in terms of their quality, neither I’m denying that they have become truly iconic in their own right, but I think it’s important to make the distinction of what can be called truly ground breaking, not to mention making the distinction between advancing the form in terms of gameplay and advancing it in terms of its potential for storytelling.

    Even then, few of the truly revolutionary games nowadays have been as groundbreaking as Ocarina of Time and Mario 64 were at the time of their release. Those two games pretty much defined the rules for practically every subsequent 3D game with a 3rd person camera. Making the same kind of impact in the medium again will probably not be possible until another massive disruption in terms of technology happens like, I don’t know, the advent of Virtual Reality or something along those lines.Edited June 2014 by docexe
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  • Avatar for Pacario #44 Pacario 2 years ago
    @sam-stephens As I said previously, if incremental "innovation" suits you, then so be it. You say Pikmin 3 combines elements of Pikmin 1 and 2 for an innovative result. I would simply say you're making my point--Nintendo's taking already existing ideas and simply repackaging them. That's being practical more than it's being visionary, but again, if refinement and variation is all you expect from the Big N, then more power to you. There's nothing wrong with that practice. It just doesn't lead to revolutionary thinking and design.

    And Nintendo used to be visionary; once upon a time, the idea of re-purposing older ideas with just a few creative tweaks here or there would have been anathema to the company. Indeed, it once was about creating brand new experiences, or at least completely reinventing ones we thought we knew. That was the idea of the Wii Remote, I think--it was supposed to change the way we saw and played video games. Beyond a few titles, however, it largely failed to prove this, but I think the intent was there.

    But back to software. I listed Mass Effect, Bioshock, and The Last of Us because they are massively groundbreaking in narrative storytelling. Games will be modeling themselves after these pillars for years. Portal redefined the puzzle genre. So did Scribblenauts. Uncharted 2 and Gears of War helped rewrite the rules of third-person action games. Little Big Planet is still the leader in game creation and sharing for the console world, not to mention on-line platforming. Call of Duty might seem old hat now, but the original Modern Warfare was hugely influential on almost everything that has come since. And as for Minecraft and Journey, I can't count them because they "aren't games?" Really now?

    I think the difference between us is, where I see a polished game, like New Super Mario U, you see an innovative game. When I see something fun, like Captain Toad, you see something epic and meaningful. But whatever the case, Nintendo no longer influences the industry the way it did back in the era of Mario 64. And there's a reason for that.
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  • Avatar for Pacario #45 Pacario 2 years ago
    @docexe Well written. Indeed, until the advent of 4-D gaming, I'm not sure anything will quite touch Mario 64, Ocarina (and honestly, Mega Man Legends before it), MGS, and GTA 3. But you can still innovate strongly within the genre itself. Mass Effect's trilogy-spanning story is a huge innovation, for example, and I'm not sure there's anything quite like it out there (outside of episodic adventure games). And LBP is still unparalleled with the creative scope it granted players in terms of level design and cooperation.

    Anyway, I see Nintendo as being more careful and skilled than brilliant and visionary these days, but that doesn't mean it isn't still pumping out quality product. Perhaps the Big N's problem is that it rarely creates those epic games we crave on the other systems. Beyond Zelda, Nintendo's lineup is based more on quick, almost perfunctory experiences, from Toad to Kirby to even Smash. And that's fine...

    Except wouldn't it be awesome if Nintendo gave us an epic Star Fox that spanned galaxies? Or a Metroid game that did the same? Or a Pokemon world that millions of players could inhabit at once? Or something else I can't even conceive of? Once upon a time, I would have expected something like that. But not anymore.
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  • Avatar for docexe #46 docexe 2 years ago
    @Pacario Yeah, they are not as revolutionary as they once were, even if they are still among the best in terms of quality and polish.

    Honestly, I think their lack of disruptiveness in recent times has been a result of becoming complacent after the initial massive success of the Wii and the DS, plus the backlash they received from fans every single time they tried to shake up their established franchises during the GCN era. And of course there is the fact that they are always so damn stubborn and conservative when it comes to adopting new technologies.

    But I think they still have some creative spark left, as shown by games like Splatoon or Code Name S.T.E.A.M. Granted, like you say they seem to be more concerned with keeping alive what you could call “the spirit of the Arcade” (fun games that can be picked up and played in small sessions with or without friends) rather than with trying to provide the massive epics that other studios are providing.

    I think that’s fine for games like Mario, Smash Bros. or even Star Fox, but I can’t deny I would love to see a Metroid and Zelda with bigger scopes in mind (indeed, I’m very curious to see what they will do with the new Zelda for Wii U). Although, in terms of storytelling, I would prefer it if they followed the Shadow of the Colossus school of minimalistic narrative as I think it is more appropriate for their games (not to mention that trying to copy the cinematic storytelling of the rest of the industry is what lead to the controversial Other M).

    Still, their creative spark and willingness to try risky gambles seems to always manifest when they have their back against the wall. It’s what lead to the Wii and DS and what has ultimately kept them alive for so many decades even in the face of increased competition and diminished relevancy compared to other big players in the game industry. So, hopefully we will see more of that creative spark in the oncoming years.Edited June 2014 by docexe
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  • Avatar for sam-stephens #47 sam-stephens 2 years ago
    @Pacario

    "Nintendo's taking already existing ideas and simply repackaging them. That's being practical more than it's being visionary, but again, if refinement and variation is all you expect from the Big N, then more power to you."

    Nintendo rarely "repackages" anything. Their games are designed from the same basic ideas, but it's the execution of those ideas that are literally game-changing. I mean, Nintendo has made Zelda games completely out of both touch screen and motion controls. It doesn't get more "visionary" than that. These are far more than small "tweaks."

    "Perhaps the Big N's problem is that it rarely creates those epic games we crave on the other systems."

    What do you mean by "epic"? Are you talking about presentation? That has very little to do with game design or innovation. Mass Effect and The Last of Us are no more "epic" than Mario & Luigi: Dream Team and Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon. Once again, this seems like a focus on the superficial. I like my gameplay no matter how it's dressed up.

    "Beyond a few titles, however, it largely failed to prove this"

    Super Mario Galaxy (1&2) Rhythm Heaven, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess/Skyward Sword, Wii Sports, Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, Mario Kart Wii, Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Donkey Kong Country Returns, and Metroid: Other M are just the games that I can think of off the top of my head that did a good job implementing motion controls.

    "But back to software. I listed Mass Effect, Bioshock, and The Last of Us because they are massively groundbreaking in narrative storytelling. Games will be modeling themselves after these pillars for years."

    I think that this, along with your last point about Nintendo's dwindled influence in the market, shows that the taste of many gamers, ironically, don't value gameplay, or at least not nearly as much as other elements (story, atmosphere, immersion, etc). These elements are popular now, but that is because it is what gamers increasingly want. In another universe where this wasn't the case, I can assure you that The Last of Us wouldn't have gained the attention it has on gameplay alone.

    "I can't count them because they 'aren't games?' Really now?"

    Well since I am discussing innovations in game design, it's probably useful to exclude products that don't feature game design (rules, goals, challenge, structure)Edited 2 times. Last edited June 2014 by sam-stephens
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  • Avatar for Pacario #48 Pacario 2 years ago
    @sam-stephens I think it's time to lay the conversation to rest for now. Again, you obviously love Nintendo no matter how ambitious or not the company is, and that's cool. Not sure you saw my earlier post, but I just got a Wii U the other day and have been enjoying Mario Kart 8 quite a bit. It's not much different than the last two or three, mind you, but it gleams with polish with an impeccable presentation.

    But I do have to say, Nintendo does repackage things all the time. The New Super Mario series is a case in point--New Super Mario Bros. (on DS), New Super Mario Bros. Wii, New Super Mario Bros. U, and New Super Mario Bros. 2 (3DS). Heck, not only do those games all play very similarly (and even share the same stylings), their titles are practically identical as well!

    Now go back and compare the graphic and gameplay styles of Super Mario 3 (even the All-Stars version) to Super Mario World to Yoshi's Island.

    See the difference?
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  • Avatar for brionfoulke91 #49 brionfoulke91 2 years ago
    @Pacario "Innovation" and "evolution" are nice, but to me, what I think is most important is keeping gameplay fresh. And I think Nintendo excels at that. Games like Captain Toad and Splatoon stand out as a type of game that no one is making right now. So does Wonderful 101 and Pikmin. Even the Mario 3D Land and World games stand out from the crowd.

    I think when people say they want "innovation," a lot of the time this is what they mean.
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  • Avatar for Pacario #50 Pacario 2 years ago
    @brionfoulke91 Splatoon does show promise--who knows, maybe it'll be the next step in reinventing the FPS/TPS?

    I'm not so sure about Captain Toad, though. The game looks fine and I'm a huge Toad fan, but it's not the kind of game that's going to change the industry. It'll probably be a modest seller, maybe a sleeper hit at best, when it comes out near this Christmas. Hope I'm wrong and it does great, though!

    One Note: Wonderful 101 technically wasn't made by Nintendo--it was only published by the company, but no doubt the game is cool. If we see more games with its kind of charm and creativity, the Wii U (or its successor) will do fine in the years to come.Edited June 2014 by Pacario
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  • Avatar for brionfoulke91 #51 brionfoulke91 2 years ago
    @Pacario But it's not about "changing the industry" and it's not about whether it'll be profitable. It's about fresh, different types of gameplay experiences. That's what really matters, and on that Captain Toad was a huge highlight from E3, just as much as Splatoon!

    And Wonderful 101 being a stellar non-Nintendo made game on Wii-U is important to point out since people think that Wii-U is only good for first party games.
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  • Avatar for Stealth20k #52 Stealth20k 2 years ago
    Yes, The system is worth it.
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  • Avatar for Pacario #53 Pacario 2 years ago
    @brionfoulke91 Nintendo is certainly not obligated to change the industry, but the company used to do just that. These days, the company is more about creating smaller, simpler experiences, many even without on-line play. Again, that's fine if these sort of games are all you want. Truly, titles like Captain Toad look like a lot of fun.

    But it also reinforces the feeling that Nintendo is not the same company I grew up with. Year ago, Nintendo was cool, exciting, cutting edge. Now it's seen more as being the eccentric old timer, and that's not just because of our changing tastes as gamers. It's simply because Nintendo doesn't make, or publish, the games we once expected, from Metroid to Goldeneye to Eternal Darkness.

    (Of course, maybe this trend is changing with the likes of Nintendo publishing Bayonetta 2. One can hope.)Edited June 2014 by Pacario
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  • Avatar for brionfoulke91 #54 brionfoulke91 2 years ago
    @Pacario Again, who cares if they're changing the game industry. Nintendo's games are fresher and more original than the competition. The other major companies are all content to keep releasing the same few types of games over and over again. That's why we need Nintendo.
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  • Avatar for EuroDarlan #55 EuroDarlan 2 years ago
    The Wii U is the way to go for complementing a gaming PC. I can play the latest and greatest new multiplatform stuff on the computer, and Nintendo's exclusive output runs circles around the competition. It's the entire backward compatible Wii library, Mario 3D Land, Pikmin 3, Zelda U, Mario Maker, Bayonetta 2, Xenoblade II, Yoshi's Wooly World, Bayo 2 against...Halo remakes, a sequel not made by Bungie, more Fable well past that series' prime, probably another tired Gears of War sequel, or in the other camp Infamous and yet another Uncharted, well after that series has been past its prime. (Last of Us 2 might have been a different story!)

    Honestly, the only thing I feel like I'm missing out on is Bloodborne and Destiny, the latter of which I'm still not entirely convinced won't be a GTA V "release the PC version a few months down the line" situation. It's not like a platform holder is paying them for exclusivity there. In the current environment, it'll be a good long time before either the PS4 or the Xbox One has enough true, not-also-on-PC, exclusives to make them worth buying, unless a gaming PC is out of the question.Edited June 2014 by EuroDarlan
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  • Avatar for cldmstrsn #56 cldmstrsn 2 years ago
  • Avatar for Thusian #57 Thusian 2 years ago
    Sometimes when I read articles like this I wonder how different I am from the authors and the expected audience of game enthusiast sites. I really only have the Wii U right now and I am really satisfied. I own quite a few games for it, and there's stuff I want to buy, but a problem with my home's foundation recently ate my discretionary spending. Even with that I still have a pile of games I need to finish and can't find the time for, so maybe I just don't play games as much as everyone on these sites. I guess I also have a 3DS so maybe that's the system the Wii U is secondary to, but I play them pretty much equally.
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  • Avatar for WelkinGunther #58 WelkinGunther 2 years ago
    Do you like local multiplayer?
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  • Avatar for TernBird #59 TernBird 2 years ago
    @Roto13 Every console has shovelware. Having more or less isn't really a measurement that can be made for or against a console. If nothing else, it's a sign of a healthy console: games getting made means there are people who will buy it.
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  • Avatar for Zomby-Woof #60 Zomby-Woof 2 years ago
    It really depends on what you're looking for in games these days. Personally, I got burnt out on gritty, overly-serious shooters during the last generation and it seems like that's what the big two are focusing on going forward. I've greatly enjoyed Halo (especially Halo), Gears, Half-Life and other shooters since they got big in the last gen. I also liked a lot of the other genres and series that went in and out of popularity, but it's hard to get excited for those same types of experiences just because they're bigger and prettier this time around. The Wii U's growing library is the antithesis to those games and it's why it gets most of my gaming time (I even have a PS4 but I haven't turned it on in months. Yes, the Wii U is my primary console). And indeed, co-op in Super Mario 3D World made me smile, something a game hasn't made me do since... well, I can't really remember exactly when. Plenty of other Wii U games made me do that as well. And the people I was playing the Mario with suddenly blurted out how much they missed those types of games... and they were smiling too. After pouring hours into the likes of Halo and Street Fighter, only getting more and more pissed at all the jerks online and all the inaccessible DLC-only playlists, it is hugely refreshing to finally ease back into a console where the focus is on the fun of the game.

    If you're in a similar position, then YES a Wii U is so worth the money, especially if you're just getting one now.

    And if you're an artist, then Miiverse is Wii U's best kept secret. Yeah, there's Deviant Art, and much of Miiverse is just kids asking for Goku in Smash Bros. but everyone on Miiverse is illustrating using the same tools, and the most popular users are all fantastic artists. Find them and you'll have a free art gallery organized into an activity feed.
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