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When Bad Isn't Bad

Have you ever played and absolutely adored a game that press and public alike seemed to despise? The USgamer team gives its thoughts on a selection of favorite "underdogs" through the years.

Article by Pete Davison, .

There are thousands of video games out there; far more than one person could reasonably expect to beat in their lifetime. So why on Earth would you want to play something that was received less than positively by press and public alike?

A common criticism of modern triple-A development is that developers don't take enough risks. These games have high production values, a huge degree of polish and demonstrate the very best that the medium has to offer. But sometimes they can feel derivative, uninteresting, soulless; publishers unwilling to take a risk on things as seemingly innocuous as a female protagonist, unconventional play mechanics or a story that tackles controversial themes can sometimes stifle creativity, leaving it up to the underdogs of the industry to try bold experiments.

These bold experiments aren't always successful, but the flawed games that are the product of such creative efforts can often be considerably more interesting than a triple-A title polished to a fine sheen. And yet there are many people out there who won't even consider the possibility of trying them when they see those sub-70 Metacritic scores. That's a real shame.

I asked the rest of the USgamer team what their favorite "bad" games from over the years were, and got some intriguing answers back. I'd love to hear what some of your favorite "bad" games are, too.

Jeremy Parish Senior Editor

SaGa Frontier

I feel sorry for SaGa Frontier. It's an interesting little game that came into the world with all the cards stacked against it. For starters, despite it being the seventh entry in a series, no one knew what to expect of it here in the States; we'd only seen half its predecessors, and those arrived hidden under the name "Final Fantasy Legend." Worse, it was the first classic-style Squaresoft RPG to arrive in the wake of Final Fantasy VII, meaning a whole lot of people were very excited to play another sweeping, cinematic masterpiece of an RPG… which SaGa Frontier very much wasn't. But the biggest problem with SaGa Frontier? It wasn't finished.

SaGa Frontier kicked off a whole string of Square RPGs that were entirely too ambitious for their own good, and coming after the epic FFVII (whose American release benefited from considerable tweaking over the Japanese version), it just felt rushed and sloppy. Players could play through overlapping yet independent scenarios for seven different characters, self-contained mini-RPGs ranging from five to 20 hours long; the original intention was to bring the whole game together with an eighth scenario belonging to a character named Fuse, but that never happened. And so it all feels disjointed and rushed.

SaGa Frontier's ambitious multi-character story unfortunately didn't quite live up to its promise.

It doesn't help that the mechanics of the SaGa series are, by nature, super super weird and unintuitive. For instance, if a character dies in battle, it's OK, because their hit points are backed up by life points. But every hit they take with zero HP subtracts LP, and once LP runs out that character is dead. Forever. You can do combo attacks with different characters, but it's not tidy like Chrono Trigger's combos -- sometimes dudes will hop in to action together if you choose the right combination of skills. And your characters learn new moves seemingly at random, with little light bulbs appearing over their heads after they execute a prerequisite move enough times. There is no indication given in-game for any of this; it just kind of… happens.

But you know, despite how alienating and rough SaGa Frontier was, I really enjoyed it. I'd never played anything quite like it, and its opaque design brought back the sense of mystery and discovery that I'd felt from gaming a decade prior, when everything was a poorly explained attempt to throw random ideas against the wall to see what sticks. With SaGa Frontier receiving universally poor ratings, I wondered at the time if my liking the game said something bad about me. Over time, I've come to realize it simply means I like to see bold game ideas that try hard to chart their own course... even if they don't quite reach the intended destination.

Brendan Sinclair Contributing Editor

Army of Two: The 40th Day

There are a lot of so-called "bad" games for which I have tremendous affinity: Time Killers, The Incredible Hulk, Earth Defense Force 2017, but I want to talk a bit about Army of Two: The 40th Day. As the middle child in an ultimately irrelevant Electronic Arts shooter franchise, The 40th Day doesn't get much respect. But beyond the blinged-out guns and sex-with-a-panda jokes, the game had an interesting morality system.

Army of Two: The 40th Day had an interesting sense of your actions having long-term consequences.

Throughout the game's campaign, players are given choices to make that affect the story. On the surface, the choices generally boil down to the standard good and evil snorefests we see in most games. However, the outcomes of those decisions often play out in unexpected (and sometimes irrelevant) ways, conveyed to the player through cutscenes. The obvious choice may be to save a character, but the cutscenes could show that character then going on to murder multiple other people. It underscores for the player how flimsy the foundations for their life-and-death decisions are, and how even the best intentions can lead to awful consequences.

Mike Williams Staff Writer

Ninja Blade

From Software is generally a serious company, having developed King's Field, Shadow Tower, Armored Core, Demon's Souls, and Dark Souls over the course of the studio's long history. Every now and then, the company has a psychotic break and creates something that's a little bit crazy. One of the times resulted in Metal Wolf Chaos for Xbox, a game everyone should experience at least once. A second break resulted in Ninja Blade for Xbox 360 and later PC.

On the surface, the game is a clone of Team Ninja's Ninja Gaiden revival mixed with a bit of Capcom's Resident Evil series, a job that it does passably. Ninja Blade hero Ken Ogawa was created with help from Microsoft, but not a shred of originality came from the pairing. No one will play Ninja Blade and leave thinking it has the tightest combat, greatest level design, or most memorable villains.

Where Ninja Blade fails in originality, it excels in insanity. From Software wanted to create a "cinematic action game," but I must assume the only movie the developers had seen was 1983's Hercules starring Lou Ferrigno.

Everything in Ninja Blade has to be there because it's awesome. It's the only explanation. Ogawa carries four different weapons on his back because it's awesome. He does amazing skateboard tricks while surfing on a missile because it's awesome. He hits a wrecking ball like a baseball because it's awesome. Why does Ogawa ride a motorcycle through the sky to shove it down a boss' throat? Because it's goddamn awesome. Every major enemy is defeated in a sequence of QTEs that must been seen to be believed; a cavalcade of pure awesome from beginning to end.

Ninja Blade is by no means a great game, but it's an amazing experience. You can pick it up on Steam for only $19.99.

Olivia Jane Content Editor

Vegas Stakes

My Dad taught me to play poker when I was five or so, and when I finally got my hands on a SNES in 1998, he thought I'd get a kick out of Vegas Stakes. Not having a huge personal library of games, which included Super Mario World, Pac Man 2: The New Adventures, Super Mario Kart, and the first two Donkey Kong games, Vegas Stakes was a game I actually played. I even beat it once or twice, taking advantage of the restart button whenever I bet everything in blackjack and lost. How else is an eleven year old supposed to make $10 million?

Vegas Stakes: teaching eleven year old Olivia the joy of gambling.

The way the game plays out is pretty simple. You pick one of four characters to play as, all of whom are attractive, and are a mixed bag of ethnicities. You can go to one of four hotel casinos until you make enough to unlock the no-limit casino. Each casino offered blackjack, slots, roulette, and 5-card stud poker. Sometimes people will come up to you and say you've lost your wallet, and at random, you'll either come up on some money or they'll have stolen your wallet. Sometimes the female characters flirt with you. One character looks creepy and I never trusted him with that wallet gag. I spent most of my time at the poker tables.

I knew the game was cheesy when I was a kid. Looking back, it's incredibly dated, including a token black guy. You don't actually get to walk around anywhere because the entire game is one menu after another. But whenever I'd bust, lost all my money, see my character standing outside the strip with his pockets turned out and empty (which is something I would see even if I picked a female character), I'd start it back up and work my way from The Hideaway, a dive casino off the strip where tables were cheap, all the way up to the coveted Laurel Palace, complete with an 8-bit theme that sounds like something you'd sing along to in church.

Pete Davison News Editor

Nier

Given that my own gaming tastes have drifted well off the "mainstream" path in recent years, there are so many titles I could talk about here, but if I had to pin it down to one favorite supposedly "bad" game, it would absolutely, positively have to be Cavia's Nier.

Nier is the sequel to the ridiculously hard-to-get "ending E" to the PS2 action RPG Drakengard. That peculiar starting point alone makes it worthy of note, but it's far from the only interesting thing about Nier.

Narrative-wise, Nier provides a refreshing change to the usual Japanese role-playing game formula in that you're playing a middle-aged character rather than a fresh-faced teenager. Despite relatively colorful graphics, it's also an incredibly bleak experience; most sidequests end in some form of tragedy, and the story as a whole is not the usual sort of uplifting "let's all save the world with love and happiness!" JRPG formula.

Nier's unrelenting bleakness makes for a game with a huge degree of emotional engagement.

The world in which Nier's story takes place is not a happy one, and I found one of the game's most frequently-criticized elements -- the prevalence of tedious fetch quests -- to actually be firmly in keeping with the game world: the world was in such a state of disarray that everyone had to "muck in" and contribute to making the best of this shattered society, so through completing the various fetch quests throughout the game, you were actually "method acting" the character of Nier to a certain degree. It was supposed to be tedious and emotionally exhausting; that perhaps didn't make for the "best" game, but it certainly made for an emotionally-engaging experience if you were willing to put the time in and put yourself in Nier's shoes.

Aside from the deep, mature story -- including, I think, the only time I've ever seen an intersex character handled sensitively and maturely in a video game, explored to a shockingly intimate degree in one of the best implementations of New Game Plus of all time -- Nier is noteworthy for a number of other reasons. Firstly is the soundtrack, which is possibly one of the finest collections of music you'll ever hear in any medium. Secondly is the incredibly diverse game mechanics that the game occasionally inexplicably flip-flops between: God of War-style combat; text adventure; bullet hell shooter. Thirdly is the sheer amount of effort which has gone into realizing Nier's world, both inside and outside the game. Even if you have no intention of actually playing the game, it's worth having a browse through the fan translation of "Grimoire Nier" -- a document that includes short stories, interviews with the developers and all manner of other fascinating bonus content that sheds a great deal of light on this game's troubled development process.

Fresh_Paprika Highlighted Community Comment

Yoshi's Story

Well, Shenmue II (on Dreamcast) is one of my favourites. An underappreciated game that should be wildly considered as a masterpiece. But it's more ignored and misunderstood than badly received (especially in America, it got some really great reviews in Europe, where they got the fantastic Dreamcast version), and the horrendous localization it got on Xbox made things worse. So I guess it doesn't count here.

So my pick is Yoshi's Story. It was an adorable, lovely game that had its own unique level clearing goals and progression (though, I agree it was FAR from perfect in that regard). It did the arts-and-crafts look a decade before Littlebigplanet and Kirby's Epic Yarn, and did it beautifully. The world and enemy designs are drop dead gorgeous to this day.

Fresh_Paprika's great community comment has been added to this article since it adds additional perspective and interest. His pick is the N64 game, Yoshi's Story

No, it wasn't a Yoshi's Island-caliber masterpiece, but what is? It still saddens me that so many people want to look down on it because it doesn't match up against Yoshi's Island. They're both very different from each other, and Nintendo noticed that when they wrapped it up, so they changed the name from Yoshi's Island 64 to Yoshi's Story. When you look at it as a different take rather than a sequel your expectations should change, but most people only wanted to see Yoshi's Island. It's a lovely, imperfect game that deserves better. Hopefully, its successor Yarn Yoshi will get some love rather than constant scrutiny.

A more recent one would be Resonance of Fate. It was frustrating and featured an incoherent battle system, the plot wasn't particularly well fleshed out, it had many faults. But it also had an original world, original themes, original feel, it did its own thing. This day and age, that's important.

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Comments 38

  • Avatar for bemaniac #1 bemaniac 3 years ago
    Well the press shit all over Parappa, Um Jammer, Parappa 2. Those were literally amazing and are still in my top 10! Then they jizz all over Vib Ribbon?!?! Vib Ribbon is over-rated!Edited June 2013 by bemaniac
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  • Avatar for pjedavison #2 pjedavison 3 years ago
    @bemaniac I love those games, too! Did the press really hate them that much? I thought they were pretty well-received when they were first released; perhaps that was just in my native UK, though.
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  • Avatar for JamieR #3 JamieR 3 years ago
    I finished Nier, it's not perfect but it's a fantastic game with a decent story.
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  • Avatar for BlazeHedgehog #4 BlazeHedgehog 3 years ago
    For me, it would be Sonic Unleashed. Without that game we wouldn't have Sonic Generations. I liked it so much it ended up being the first game I ever made a video review for, four years ago. http://blip.tv/bltn/sonic-unleashed-xbox-360-2874561
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  • Avatar for Karisu #5 Karisu 3 years ago
    Nier is one of my favorite games of this generation. Still need to go back for play-through 2 and 3 and 4...

    And the score to that game. My god, one of the best ever made. I used to (and still do on occasion) just sit and listen to it while reading.Edited June 2013 by Karisu
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  • Avatar for JohnnyIsTruant #6 JohnnyIsTruant 3 years ago
    Hey, the yanks got an EG too now? Love the comment system, very snazzy. In regards to the article I'm going to have to go with Kane & Lynch 2. Never have I seen a game that personifies complete and utter despair quite as well as that did.
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  • Avatar for bravepixel #7 bravepixel 3 years ago
    I'm embarrassed to say I love Dynasty Warriors. Something about the unlockables.
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  • Avatar for pjedavison #8 pjedavison 3 years ago
    @bravepixel No shame in that! I haven't played a Dynasty Warriors game for a while, but I always had a blast with them in the past -- particularly when playing with a friend in split-screen mode. Good times.
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  • Avatar for Solid-State-Survivor #9 Solid-State-Survivor 3 years ago
    Hey Olivia - I agree Vegas Stakes is fantastic! As a matter of fact I was playing it on the SNES just the other night. The production values are great and it makes excellent use of the SNES mouse.

    A quick correction though - in Vegas Stakes you never pick a character to play as - instead you can call one of your friends to go gambling with you. They sort of guide you along and make small talk throughout. Even cooler is that at any point you can go to your hotel room and phone a different friend to go out with you- a definite plus since each one gives good or bad advice in different games.
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  • Avatar for Kadrom #10 Kadrom 3 years ago
    It's a shame more people didn't play Nier and equally sad that a lot of them disliked or skipped the sidequests, since that's where a lot of the characterization is revealed with the banter between Weiss, Nier and the others. 8-4 did a fine job with the localization.

    Also the entirety of the Ending B playthrough is still the most depressing thing I've ever played.Edited 2 times. Last edited June 2013 by Kadrom
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  • Avatar for davidgreenwood80 #11 davidgreenwood80 3 years ago
    "TAIL OF THE SUN"! It made me an ArtDink fan for life.
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  • Avatar for Stealth20k #12 Stealth20k 3 years ago
    was nier really hated on?
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  • Avatar for jeffgrubb39 #13 jeffgrubb39 3 years ago
    My game is definitely that Jango Fett Bounty Hunter game from the Xbox/GameCube era.

    Also, how does the lady in the top picture tie her underwear?
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  • Avatar for alexb #14 alexb 3 years ago
    @Stealth20k Check out that metacritic score. Even Star Ocean 4 got a better aggregate. No accounting for taste, sadly.
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  • Avatar for Andy1975 #15 Andy1975 3 years ago
    Is Deadly Premonition too obvious?
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  • Avatar for SargeSmash #16 SargeSmash 3 years ago
    Black Sigil for DS was that game for me.
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  • Avatar for Thinaran #17 Thinaran 3 years ago
    I am absolutely a part of the cult of Nier. An amazing game and one of my faves from this gen. The trick is to just not do the sidequests (though I know people who have 100 % cheevos on it).
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  • Avatar for pjedavison #18 pjedavison 3 years ago
    @Andy1975 Nope! That's a great choice. (And a great game, too!)
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  • Avatar for Stealth20k #19 Stealth20k 3 years ago
    @alexb I worked for aggregates so I tend to ignore them now.

    WHoever mentioned black sigil I put 100 hours in
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  • Avatar for IPA #20 IPA 3 years ago
    Interesting idea for an article; however, (barring Nier) I would call all those games objectively bad.

    It seems like these quick-takes on "overlooked" games are more about a view into the personal tastes and eccentricities of a given editor (i.e. purely subjective) -- and that doesn't make them any less interesting. :)
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  • Avatar for justinleighton10 #21 justinleighton10 3 years ago
    I need to finish playing Saga Frontier 2 and Nier at some point in my life. I don't know how anyone can not like Saga Frontier 2, it's so ridiculously charming.
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  • Avatar for Riverking #22 Riverking 3 years ago
    SaGa Frontier and Nier are two of my niche favorites.

    Probably played through SF 25 or so times since it was released.

    Edit: I would add The Last Remnant to that list were I to write an entry.Edited 2 times. Last edited June 2013 by Riverking
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  • Avatar for Kuni-Nino #23 Kuni-Nino 3 years ago
    Mentioning Nier as a favorite game is a great way to get on my good side. That's in my top ten of the generation.

    Another game that's in my top ten of the generation that fits on this list: Alpha Protocol. It's basically Mass Effect 1 in terms of mechanics but with a story you can actually manipulate. It deals with spies and international politics too. It's nice to see an RPG that isn't medieval or sci-fi dreck.bEdited June 2013 by Kuni-Nino
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  • Avatar for Fresh_Paprika #24 Fresh_Paprika 3 years ago
    Well Shenmue II (on Dreamcast) is one of my favourites. An under appreciated game that should be wildly considered as a masterpiece. But it's more ignored and misunderstood than badly received (especially in America, it got some really great reviews in Europe, where they got the fantastic Dreamcast version), the horrendous localization it got on Xbox made things worse. So I guess it doesn't count here.

    So my pick is Yoshi's Story. It was an adorable, lovely game that had its own unique level clearing goals and progression (though, I agree it was FAR from perfect in that regard). It did the arts & crafts look a decade before Littlebigplanet and Kirby's Epic Yarn, and did it beautifully. The world and enemy designs are drop dead gorgeous to this day.

    No, it wasn't a Yoshi's Island caliber masterpiece, but what is? It still saddens me that so many people want to look down on it because it doesn't match up against Yoshi's Island. They're both very different from each other, and Nintendo noticed that when they wrapped it up, so they changed the name from Yoshi's Island 64 to Yoshi's Story. When you look at it as a different take rather than a sequel your expectations should change, but most people only wanted to see Yoshi's Island.

    It's a lovely, imperfect game that deserves better. Hopefully, its successor Yarn Yoshi will get some love rather than constant scrutiny.

    A more recent one would be Resonance of Fate. It was frustrating and featured an incoherent battle system, the plot wasn't particularly well fleshed out, it had many faults. But it also had an original world, original themes, original feel, it did its own thing. This day and age, that's important.Edited June 2013 by Fresh_Paprika
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  • Avatar for Jaz_Rignall #25 Jaz_Rignall 3 years ago
    @Fresh_Paprika Thanks for this great comment. Something we want to do - and do more of as we get better established - is to incorporate great community comments and perspectives into USG's editorial to give it extra richness and value. Congrats - you're the first poster to be featured this way!
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  • Avatar for Alpha-Unit #26 Alpha-Unit 3 years ago
    @Fresh_Paprika Geez. I wish I had the patience to write something that long into a comment.
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  • Avatar for Bla1ne #27 Bla1ne 3 years ago
    The game that instantly comes to mind for me is MAG because, even though I poured roughly 400 hours into that game, loved every minute, every time I tell someone how good it was I almost have to do it apologetically.

    (No joke, I had actually written an entire wall of text here detailing why the game wasn't so well received, why it was great, and what I loved about it. But my wall of text was so huge, I decided it would be best not to post it...)

    It was a great game, but not so well received (edit: by critics... who played it for maybe 20 hours--not even enough to properly learn a single map, let alone the game's mechanics, leadership positions, skill tree... but I digress). Because of that, people who haven't played it, or people who didn't get hooked, have this preconceived notion that it was a bad game. But they couldn't be more wrong! Best multiplayer FPS I've ever played--and YES, I've played a lot of them; NO I never liked CoD.Edited June 2013 by Bla1ne
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  • Avatar for juliankennedy23 #28 juliankennedy23 3 years ago
    I have to go with Alpha Protocal with a shout out to Rumble Roses XX which is still my favorite wrestling game of this generation
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  • Avatar for Fresh_Paprika #29 Fresh_Paprika 3 years ago
    Wow. Thank you!

    I almost never comment on anything, there's usually little point in it. This is very encouraging,
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  • Avatar for MattG #30 MattG 3 years ago
    No love for the PS3/X360/PC Bionic Commando revival? Spencer's bionic arm does take some practice to control efficiently, but that should not be a surprise. It took some time and a little effort to master the bionic arm in the original 1988 Bionic Commando as well as the BC Rearmed remake. Like anything worthwhile in life, practice makes perfect. Being able to swing through the air while shooting at enemy grunts does not come easy, but is so rewarding when done right. After about three hours worth of total playing time I was able to perform three consecutive swings into the middle of a troop of soldiers, shoot one as I approached, drop a grenade on two others, and dispatch the last one by snagging him with the bionic arm and slamming him into Spencer's boots all without losing momentum.

    Just like performing on-demand headshots in a first-person shooter or power sliding around every curve in a racing challenge, mastering the bionic arm requires patience and training. Automating the bionic arm's lock-on mechanic as some have suggested would have completely defeated the purpose of the game, just as if Mario's jumping were done on-rails or Captain Falcon's car sported automatic acceleration. I thought it was a fantastic game and am disappointed that it didn't lead to bigger things.
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  • Avatar for jeremy.parish #31 jeremy.parish 3 years ago
    Ugh, I want to punch the 3D Bionic Commando game until it vanishes from the timeline. Such a waste of a franchise. Some good moment-to-moment mechanics squandered on a sloppy overall package. Heartbreaking stuff for a lifelong BC fan like me.
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  • Avatar for EuroDarlan #32 EuroDarlan 3 years ago
    I wouldn't say it was poorly received per se, but the general reception to Maximo: Ghosts to Glory on the PS2 seemed to "eh, it's all right" when I found it to be one of the best PS2 games, and perhaps the most successful throwback to the NES days we've seen yet. Charming visuals, hard but fair gameplay, fun upgrade system, plenty of risk/reward, old school platforming...I freaking loved it. The sequel wasn't quite as good, but I'd love to see another game in the same spirit.
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  • Avatar for MattG #33 MattG 3 years ago
    @jeremy.parish The dark angst of the 3D Bionic Commando is over the top (I always play with the '80s Spencer skin), but I loved the mechanics. I hope Capcom tries again someday with the franchise. There's so much potential in it.
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  • Avatar for MissDeviling #34 MissDeviling 3 years ago
    I loved Sengoku Basara: Samurai Heroes. Bit on the easy side, and not the prettiest game ever, but the combat was amazingly fun and infinitely less stale than Dynasty Warriors. No one seems to care for hack and slash in the West, though, so it goes unnoticed. Capcom never to bring it to the West again. :(
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  • Avatar for MetManMas #35 MetManMas 3 years ago
    One of my favorite underdogs is Torneko: The Last Hope. The reviewers panned it; it was a 2D game on the PlayStation during a time when games were bashed for being 2D, and on top of that, it had the gall to be a randomly generated dungeon game where you lose all your experience levels when you leave a dungeon and all of your onhand items when you die. Most reviewers and players wrote it off as "That game worse than Atari stuff" and threw it aside.

    Joke's on them, though; the game's great.

    Sure, the dungeons are random, but what matters is the variables within them. You have your weapon fodder like slimes, but there are also enemies that can tear through the dungeon walls, enemies that may make clones of themselves when hit, enemies that actively seek out and kill other enemies to level up and become a bigger threat. Status effects are a legitimate disadvantage. This type of variety also applies to every rod, pot, weapon, shield, trap, scroll, and NPC you may come across.

    Sure, leveling up is never permanent, but it's not a game about simply getting stronger and overpowering everything. The gameplay is more an arcade-like RPG than anything, and the lack of permanent level-ups keeps things tense and exciting throughout a dungeon run instead of half-heartedly steamrolling everything in sight.

    Sure, you lose all your items if you die, but you can store any items you want to keep back at home base, maybe set aside a sword and shield you like to upgrade for a future dungeon run. It won't help you in the postgame dungeons where you can't take anything along, and they can be just as easily lost as anything, but stowing away some items for a later dungeon run (and the new facilities that open up as you progress) will give you an edge on later dungeon attempts.

    If you're looking for an RPG with fancy cutscenes, flashy graphics, and a heavy emphasis on narrative, it will disappoint you. But if you're looking for an arcade style RPG experience where every move matters, Torneko: The Last Hope may be the game for you.
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  • Avatar for BadoorSNK #36 BadoorSNK 3 years ago
    @MattG I'm a fan of the 2009 Bionic Commando too. Yeah, the story's clumsy & some of the level design is awkward & doesn't make much use of the very solid mechanics. But they are very solid mechanics. I played the prerelease Multiplayer demo for days. I think I might've enjoyed that more than the SP game itself. The fact that the levels are more open by nature of them being made for MP, with the added emphasis on location & motion against other Bionic-Armed players, made it exploit the mechanics more justifiably than the "just run in tunnel & shoot stationary NPC soldiers" levels in single player. Though I still enjoyed SP mode, especially some of the bosses.
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  • Avatar for scottyjx #37 scottyjx 3 years ago
    I really, really, really loved True Crime: Streets of New York, and it's been so long since I've played it, that it's hard for me to articulate why I loved it so much. I knew then it was rather flawed, but I had a blast playing it.
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  • Avatar for scottyjx #38 scottyjx 3 years ago
    Deleted July 2013 by scottyjx
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  • Avatar for faymebazin08 #39 faymebazin08 9 months ago
    Deleted March 2016 by faymebazin08
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  • Avatar for emmajohnson11 #40 emmajohnson11 7 months ago
    This year the DoubleDown Casino is one of the best free casino websites. Anyway, great classification.

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