Destiny 2: Forsaken's Lost Sectors Are the Best They've Ever Been

Destiny 2: Forsaken's Lost Sectors Are the Best They've Ever Been

Lost Sectors on The Tangled Shore are way more interesting than the base game's.

Tucked away in The Tangled Shore, between space rocks tethered together by thick wire and Silent Hill b-side enemies loitering about, you'll find little caverns of paradise. It's the area's Lost Sectors.

In Destiny 2's base game planets, and the two expansions that came after it, Lost Sectors have hardly been anything to marvel at. They're usually just caves or basements with some sort of enemy lurking within. I can only recall a couple, and that's because I think of them as ol' faithfuls—where the loot is always solid. Lost Sectors aren't quite loot caves, but they're good enough and reliable for farming. Tangled Shore redefines what a Lost Sector can be though: that they can be enhance the world too.

Sure, we've been on the Reef before in Destiny, but Tangled Shore is easily the best new planet of Destiny 2's expansions so far.

A few days ago, I wrote about one particular Lost Sector on Forsaken's new Tangled Shore area in The Reef, in which Paul McCartney's end credits jam "Hope for the Future" from the first Destiny echoes through its halls. When I stumbled upon it, I was genuinely shocked, and in the video I tweeted, confused too. "Hope for the Future" was a baffling misstep back when Destiny first released, and since then, has kinda been a joke tethered to Bungie. With this Lost Sector cameo, in which a Fallen is seemingly DJing the track, it seems that Bungie has a sense of humor about it now.

That's not the end of Tangled Shore's interesting Lost Sectors though. There's also Trapper's Cave, where you discover a beautiful oasis with a lot of greenery—which is rare for the deeply purple, desolate planetary area. Another Lost Sector has you boost high up into the sky from within a skyscraper.

Another one of my favorites is Shipyard AWO-43, where you fight a giant Servitor across a floating scrapyard. Environment wise, it's easy to fall off the map with a bunch of Fallen lunging towards you. With the handy bow though, it's easier to clear through by headshotting all the enemies with expert precision. This particular Lost Sector is one I can see myself returning to a lot because of its clever design.

The Lost Sectors on Tangled Shore remind me of what I wish the planets of Destiny 2 emphasized a little bit more: exploration. When I revisited No Man's Sky earlier this year for its Next update, while playing it I found myself wishing it could mash together with Destiny 2. That's because combat wise No Man's Sky is not great, but in the visual and exploration department, it's remarkable. I see a lot of No Man's Sky's DNA in Destiny 2's planets, from its lush red trees on Nessus to the bright seas of Titan. But when exploring said planets, the areas within them have been usually lackluster. There's no mystery, no exciting design. Only various types of aliens to shoot at.

With the Forsaken expansion, there's at least a little more to uncover now, in addition to Tangled Shores' enlivened Lost Sectors. Now, there's also lore to discover on planets for triumphs. If you find something glowing, you can investigate it with your ghost and get a fully written little nugget of lore, instead of your Ghost just parroting some little soundbite at you like in vanilla Destiny 2. It's not a lot, but it's something at least.

Even with Forsaken's improvements, it's not perfect. Upgrading weapons now requires more components, making holding onto your famed Exotic and powering it strong a chore. Legendaries, I've found, drop far less often now; my inventory is a sea of blues. I don't know if Forsaken's big changes are enough to pull me back into playing Destiny 2 on a regular basis again. Its campaign is basically just a boss rush—albeit with some cool bosses—and its new raid, The Last Wish, is still about a week away. As I wait to try out the raid, I'm excited to take a break from Destiny 2: Forsaken for a minute. When I come back, I know I'm going to make a beeline to that Lost Sector where I can hear a former Beatle's voice, wishing the rest of Destiny 2's Lost Sectors had cool attentions to detail like it.

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Caty McCarthy

Senior Editor

Caty McCarthy is a former freelance writer whose work has appeared in Kill Screen, VICE, The AV Club, Kotaku, Polygon, and IGN. When she's not blathering into a podcast mic, reading a book, or playing a billion video games at once, she's probably watching Terrace House or something. She is currently USgamer's official altgame enthusiast.

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