Fortnite's Latest Event Had to Actually Cap Out Its Player Count

Fortnite's Latest Event Had to Actually Cap Out Its Player Count

As a result, more than 2 million tuned in to watch the event on Twitch.

Taking on the storm, the ever-encroaching barrier that hems Fortnite's players together, is a neat enough idea for a live in-game event. Today, though, the event that brought Fortnite Chapter Two - Season Two to a close was a bit more notable for how many folks couldn't watch it in game than who could.

Half an hour before the event started, Epic announced that it hit a player cap for the game across all Fortnite platforms. As a result, Fortnite fans flocked to streaming services who managed to get into the event, bringing Fortnite's viewer count on Twitch to over 2 million. Many responded to the announcement requesting that the event be delayed to allow more players to attend. After it all wrapped up, Epic issued a short apology to those who couldn't see it themselves.

Epic's Donald Mustard, worldwide creative director, took to Twitter to say that he was also unable to log in for the event. His tweet says the event attracted the "most people ever," though until Epic releases final numbers for today, it might be a bit early to say it has definitively claimed the all-time record for concurrent players.

The number to beat is somewhere over 12.3 million players, which is the record Fortnite set with the debut of Travis Scott's Astronomical show back in April. While that was a lengthy musical experience, today's event instead set the stage for Season 3's launch on June 17 with what looks to be a huge, semi-permanent change to Fortnite's battle royale map. The Agency device intended to push the Storm back seems to have malfunctioned, sinking the island. Now, the whole playable area is surrounded by a wall of water that damages players in much the same way as Storm, but it has to be swam through.

We'll be sure to update this article if Epic is quick to release official player count and viewership numbers for this storm event. Cataclysmic tidal events aside, it seems Epic is committed to delivering more live in-game events in Fortnite for the foreseeable future, especially in the no-combat Party Royale mode that launched last month.

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Mathew Olson

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Mathew Olson is a writer formerly of Digg, where he blogged and reported about all things under the umbrella of internet culture (including games, of course). He lives in New York, grew up under rain clouds and the influence of numerous games studios in the Pacific Northwest, and will talk your ear off about Half-Life mods, Talking Heads or Twin Peaks if you let him.

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