PSN Name Changes Confirmed by Sony - Trial Period Soon, Followed by Full Release in 2019

PSN Name Changes Confirmed by Sony - Trial Period Soon, Followed by Full Release in 2019

ID-iotic PSN names are soon to be a thing of the past.

PSN ID changes, one of the most requested PSN features over the years, is finally coming. Sony has revealed that the new functionality will be tested by select users during a beta period as part of the PlayStation Preview Program, before being rolled out to all users in 2019.

If you've always hated your PlayStation Network Online ID (hello, xXxHorseLoverxXx), the day you can change it is finally approaching. Sony has revealed that the ID changing service will be free for one change, but subsequent changes will cost $9.99/€9.99/£7.99 for normal PSN users, while PS Plus members will get the discounted pricing of $4.99/€4.99/£3.99. During the testing period you can change as many times as you like for no cost.

The PSN ID change functionality will be found in the Settings menu or the Profile page of your PS4. If you choose to change your ID you can display your previous ID alongside the new one, but you can't change this preference once you've completed the process. Sony has stated that the feature is only 100% compatible with PS4 games released after April 1, 2018, but that a "large majority of the most played PS4 games that were released before this date" will also support the PSN ID change feature.

Sony has said that players who change their ID may encounter some problems with unsupported titles, but is planning to release "a list of compatible games published before April 1, 2018". The testing period for PSN ID changing concludes at the end of November 2018, and will officially launch for everyone early in 2019.

Tom Orry

Audience Development Manager, Gamer Network

Tom started life on a circus in Australia before his family moved to the UK. His love of gaming started soon after, which essentially meant he bought every video game magazine available and worked numerous part-time jobs as a child in order to afford costly N64 games. He created UK site VideoGamer.com, of which he was the Editor for over a decade. He now doesn't like circuses.

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