SNES Classic Hardware is Identical to the NES Classic

SNES Classic Hardware is Identical to the NES Classic

This could be a good sign there will be more classic consoles in the future.

The SNES Classic is in the hands of members of the press as well as some lucky customers who got their units in early, so naturally everyone is trying to tear the little thing to pieces to learn its secrets. One interesting tidbit unearthed, first by the internet, then confirmed by our colleagues at Digital Foundry, is that the SNES Classic runs the same hardware as the NES Classic.

The fact that the SNES and NES Classic recycles the same hardware isn't too surprising given that Digital Foundry notes the fact that the controller, HDMI, and USB placements are identical on the SNES and NES Classic. However, that Nintendo is manufacturing the same hardware for the SNES and NES Classic has some implications regarding the console's future. Namely in regards to its production and how the community will proceed with this information.

First off, the SNES Classic and NES Classic are nearly identical. According to DF's breakdown. Both systems are running the same internal mainboard, including the little cuts made so that they fit inside the NES Classic shell. Looking at the images, you can even see that the wiring and setup of the chips (four ARM Cortex A7s with an ARM Mali 400 MP2 GPU, 356 DDR3 module, and 512MB NAND storage) are also the same.

NES Classic (Left) and SNES Classic (Right) via Digital Foundry

Basically, if Nintendo is manufacturing the same boards for both the SNES and NES that means that production for the Classic consoles are pretty much the same. With the production streamlined for both the SNES and NES Classic, it could mean good things for Nintendo's proposed rollout of the SNES Classic console through the holidays and new run of NES Classic consoles next summer.

Secondly, modders will no doubt be able to dig into the SNES Classic like they have with the NES Classic. Since the work has already been done on the NES Classic, it won't be a tall order for wild and weird mods to start appearing on the SNES Classic.

The SNES Classic is officially out this Friday and we have a mini console in our possession right now which we're working with to bring you full coverage of. In the meantime, we reviewed every SNES game on the console (sans Star Fox 2, which we'll have a review for later today). Or, you can check out our complete guide to the SNES Classic to prepare for the release.

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Matt Kim

News Editor

Matt Kim is a former freelance writer who's covered video games and digital media. He likes video games as spectacle and is easily distracted by bright lights or clever bits of dialogue. He also once wrote about personal finance, but that's neither here nor there.

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